Announcements of Upcoming Meetings

Notice that this list is not meant to be all-inclusive, but concentrates on meetings of potential interest to X-ray, gamma-ray, cosmic-ray, and gravitational astrophysicists. The HEASARC also maintains a list of upcoming high-energy astrophysics summer schools, a list of on-line proceedings of high-energy astrophysics meetings, as well as a list of on-line proceedings of high-energy astrophysics summer schools.

Updates, corrections, and/or suggestions about meetings should be sent to stephen.a.drake@nasa.gov

Other Sources of Information on Upcoming Meetings

List of International Astronomy meetings maintained by the Canadian Astronomy Data Center
Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Space Calendar


High Energy Astrophysics meetings

2018 June 6 - 8: Ultra-Luminous X-ray Pulsars

2018 June 11 - 15: Half a Century of Blazars and Beyond

2018 June 13 - 15: Time-Domain Astronomy: A High Energy View (XMM Newton Science Workshop 2018)

2018 June 18 - 22: 3rd PANDA Symposium on Time-Domain Astronomy and HXMT First Results

2018 July 1 - 7: Fifteenth Marcel Grossmann Meeting - MG15

2018 July 8 - 13: 12th International LISA Symposium

2018 July 14 - 22: 42nd Scientific Assembly of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and Associated Events (COSPAR 2018)

2018 July 30 - August 3: Are AGN Special? The Environmental Dependence and Global Impact of AGN Activity

2018 August 6 - 7: X-Ray Skies with High-Res Eyes: Imaging the Cosmos with AXIS

2018 August 8 - 10: Chandra Science Workshop on Accretion in Stellar Systems

2018 August 12 - 18: Very High Energy Phenomena in the Universe 2018 (VHEPU-2018, Rencontres du Vietnam)

2018 August 20 - 22: Radionuclide Astronomy in the 2020's and Beyond (RA2020)

2018 August 22 - 23: IAU Focus Meeting on "Radio GalaxIes: Resolving the AGN Phenomenon" at the IAU General Assembly 2018

2018 August 27 - 31: 2018 TeV Particle Astrophysics (TeVPA)

2018 August 27 - 31: IAU Symposium 346: High-Mass X-ray Binaries: Illuminating the Passage from Massive Binaries to Merging Compact Objects

2018 September 3 - 5: The Gamma Cas Phenomenon in Be Stars

2018 September 9 - 15: 8th International Workshop on Astronomy and Relativistic Astrophysics - IWARA 2018

2018 September 12 - 15: International Conference on Black Holes as Cosmic Batteries: UHECRs and Multimessenger Astronomy

2018 September 24 - 27: Exploring the Hot and Energetic Universe: The Second Scientific Conference Dedicated to the Athena X-ray Observatory

2018 October 1 - 5: Breaking the Limits 2018: Super-Eddington Accretion onto Compact Objects

2018 October 7 - 14: The Multi-Messenger Astronomy: Gamma-Ray Bursts, Search for Electromagnetic Counterparts to Neutrino Events and Gravitational Waves

2018 October 14 - 19: Eighth International Fermi Symposium


Other Selected Astronomy, Physics and Space Science meetings

2018 June 3 - 7: American Astronomical Society Meeting 232

2018 July 29 - August 3: Cool Stars 20: The Twentieth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun

2018 August 20 - 31: International Astronomical Union 30th General Assembly

2019 January 6 - 10: American Astronomical Society Meeting 233

2019 June: American Astronomical Society Meeting 234

2020 January 5 - 9: American Astronomical Society Meeting 235


Selected Astronomy-related Physics, Computational, Data Analysis, Software or Statistics meetings

2018 May 29 - June 2: Summer School in Statistics for Astronomers XIV

2018 June 4 - 8: Summer School in Astroinformatics


High Energy Astrophysics meetings

Ultra-luminous X-ray Pulsars

Workshop Dates: 2018 June 6 - 8
Registration and Abstract Submission Deadline: 2018 March 31 or when capacity of 50 participants is reached
Workshop Location: Villafranca del Castillo, Madrid, Spain

Ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) are accreting compact objects in nearby galaxies, which emit X-rays in excess of their spherical Eddington limit. Due to their brightness, most of them are believed to be black holes. However, recently a new class of ULXs was discovered, through the detection of coherent pulsations. The presence of pulsations unambiguously identifies the compact objects as neutron stars, which are typically less massive than black holes, and these are referred to as Ultra-luminous X-ray pulsars (ULPs). In ULPs, the neutron star accretes matter from a companion star at inferred rates much higher than previously expected.

Currently three of these systems are known: M82 X-2, NGC 5907 ULX, and NGC 7793 P13 (with NGC 300 ULX-1 a likely fourth). Their existence challenges our understanding of accretion physics and stellar evolution. Today, no widely accepted theory has emerged to explain all their observational properties. Furthermore, a clear path forward to obtain a full sample of the ULP population is missing.

At this workshop, we will bring together experts in observations, accretion models, and stellar evolution for an exchange of knowledge, ideas, and expertise. The goal of the workshop is to collect the observational evidence, make progress on our theoretical understanding, and identify open questions and projects to work on for the coming years in order to obtain a better understanding of the physics and evolution of ULPs. To this end, the format of the workshop will consist of a mix between review talks by international experts, talks and posters by all participants, and ample time for discussion and project work.

We will in particular discuss observational opportunities with current (e.g. XMM-Newton, Chandra, NuSTAR and the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory) and upcoming (e.g. XARM and Athena) X-ray telescopes and multi-wavelength follow up.

For questions please contact Felix Fuerst (ulp-workshop "at" sciops.esa.int) or any of the SOC members listed on the workshop website.

Half a Century of Blazars and Beyond

Conference Dates: 2018 June 11 - 15
Opening of Early Registration and Abstract Submission: 2018 January 08
Opening of Nominal Registration : 2018 February 11
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2018 March 11
Opening of Late Registration: 2018 April 11
Conference Location: Torino (Turin), Italy

Blazars are exemplary systems in which to study relativistic jet processes and connections to accretion onto super-massive black holes. Over half a century ago, studies began recognizing blazars as being distinguished by their flat radio spectra, compactness, variability, and polarized radio and optical emission. Over the past decade, they have become ubiquitous in the high-energy gamma-ray and very-high energy gamma-ray skies. Importantly, blazars have an expanding role in understanding high-energy astrophysics processes and significance in multi-messenger observations, thus driving future mission endeavors.

The Fermi Large Area Telescope has changed the landscape, offering 1000’s of gamma-ray blazars for study, and will provide continual all-sky monitoring over the coming decade. The gamma-ray monitoring will soon be joined by sky-survey capabilities in X-rays, optical, radio, infrared, and TeV gamma-rays, will bring an unprecedentedly complete multi-wavelength picture of their population. The Event Horizon Telescope is already making its mark in directly probing the collimation region of the jet base. The coming decade will also realize the multi-messenger connection particularly with IceCube high-energy neutrinos, and the possible role of blazars in the production of ultra high energy cosmic rays is being explored. How blazars may contribute to our understanding binary supermassive black hole systems with Pulsar Timing Arrays and in the LISA-era is ripe for study.

This conference will aim to synthesize the current observational and theoretical understanding of blazars and will anticipate coming frontiers in blazar research including X-ray and gamma-ray polarimetry, MeV gamma-ray prospects with proposed missions, and prospective X-ray imaging studies. The observations anticipated will be driven by advances in understanding of particle acceleration mechanisms through simulations and theory.

TOPICS:

  • Gamma-ray linchpin: Fermi and Beyond (e-ASTROGAM and AMEGO, CTA)
  • Role of X-ray and Gamma-ray polarimetry (XIPE, IXPE)
  • Jet collimation on Event-Horizon Scales
  • The (Enrico) Fermi connection: particle acceleration, jet launching, and simulations
  • Connection to ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos
  • Identification, population, and time-domain studies with panchromatic all-sky surveys
  • Jet signatures of super-massive black hole binaries and relation to low-frequency gravitational waves

Time-Domain Astronomy: A High Energy View (XMM Newton Science Workshop 2018)

Workshop Dates: 2018 June 13 - 15
Opening of Registration and Abstract Submission: Now Open
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2018 March 9
Notification about Accepted Presentations: 2018 April 16
Early Registration Deadline: 2018 April 30
Late Registration Deadline: 2018 May 30
Meeting Location: Villafranca del Castillo, Madrid, Spain

Many astronomical objects are time variable. Time variability encodes key information about the source physics; this information is complementary to that in energy spectra and is essential for our complete understanding of the phenomena involved. Most X-ray emitting objects show variability whose timescales can span many orders of magnitudes, from decades down to milliseconds depending on the source. Studying X-ray variability, we can probe the physics of a large number of phenomena in a plethora of different astrophysical objects, from large scale changes of galactic environments down to the direct environment of compact accretion objects. Objects studied include solar system objects and stars, novae and supernovae, pulsars and magnetars, Galactic black holes and supermassive black holes in the centre of active galactic nuclei.

With the upcoming multi-wavelength time-domain monitoring facilities such as Gaia, LSST, ASAS, TESS, PanSTARRS in the optical band, or SKA in the radio band, to name a few, an enormous potential for multi-wavelength studies will soon be available. The workshop aims to summarise the current understanding of the variability in high energy astrophysical objects in order to explore the potential synergy with other (new) time-domain facilities and to foster cooperation between observers in different energy bands.

Registration opening and abstract submission are planned for January 2018.

Contact e-mail: xmmws2018@sciops.esa.int

3rd PANDA Symposium on Time-Domain Astronomy and HXMT First Results

Meeting Dates: 2018 June 18 - 22
Deadline for Registration and Abstract Submission: 2018 May 15
Meeting Location: Chengdu, China

The PANDA Symposia series are aiming at establishing and fostering collaborations among young postdoctoral fellows (0-6 years from graduation) from the Pacific/Asiatic scientific community with their peers across the globe. Besides enabling scientific mobility and networking, the organizers are also aiming in providing young researchers with a forum to exchange ideas on current and future projects.

The Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT), also known as Insight, is China's first space X-ray astronomy satellite, designed to observe X-ray emission from galactic and extragalactic transients, and compact objects, such as black holes, neutron stars and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). This satellite was launched on June 15, 2017; it has completed the commissioning phase and it is now in full operational mode. The mission also participated in a global joint observation in search of the electromagnetic counterparts of GW170817, providing stringent constraints for the properties of the binary neutron star merger. The organizers plan to unveil the first scientific results from the Insight-HXMT mission a year after its launch, and to discuss some hot topics in high-energy astrophysics. Hence, they have organized the 3rd PANDA Symposium, aiming at introducing the Insight-HXMT results to the international astrophysics community.

The 3rd PANDA Symposium will include experts in many high-energy astrophysics areas, in particular multi-wavelength Time Domain Astrophysics. It is organized in 5 days focused presenting the satellite's instrument operation status and performance as well as scientific contributions interspersed in several scientific areas encompassing extreme astrophysical environments and the physical processes in the transient Universe: gravitational waves and their electromagnetic counterparts, Gamma-Ray Bursts, accretion on black holes and neutron stars, pulsars, magnetars, as well as Galactic Plane monitoring and surveying for high energy transients. A good part of the meeting will be dedicated in lively discussions fostering international multi-wavelength collaborations on new ideas and multi- mission projects.

Fifteenth Marcel Grossmann Meeting - MG15

Meeting Dates: 2018 July 1 - 7
Deadline for Online Parallel Session or Plenary Talk Abstract Submission and Poster Presentation: 2018 April 30
Meeting Location: Rome, Italy

The Fifteenth Marcel Grossmann Meeting on Recent Developments in Theoretical and Experimental General Relativity, Astrophysics and Relativistic Field Theories (MG15) will take place at "La Sapienza" University in Rome, Italy. Registration will take place on Sunday, July 1, and the official opening of the meeting will be on Monday morning, July 2. During this six day conference, a variety of topics will be discussed in the morning plenary sessions with preliminary schedule, beginning with Mathematical Topics on Monday, Quantum and Gravity on Tuesday, Gravitational Waves on Wednesday, GRBs and Galactic Center Black Holes on Thursday, Cosmology and Space Science on Friday and "The Frontiers" on Saturday. There will be six plenary lectures each morning and up to twenty parallel sessions in the four weekday afternoons excluding Wednesday,

12th International LISA Symposium

Meeting Dates: 2018 July 8 - 13
Abstract Submission: Now available
Deadline for Regular Registration: 2018 April 25
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2018 May 7, 9:00pm EDT
Deadline for Hotel Reservations: 2018 June 13
Deadline for Late Registration: 2018 July 13
Meeting Location: Chicago, Illinois, USA

The week will feature a program dedicated to gravitational wave astrophysics broadly, but with special emphasis on sources that can be observed in the millihertz band by LISA, the current status and unique challenges in gravitational theory and analysis for LISA sources, and the latest updates on the development of the LISA mission.

42nd Scientific Assembly of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and Associated Events (COSPAR 2018)

Meeting Dates: 2018 July 14 - 22
Website Opens for Abstract Submissions: 2017 August 19
Deadline for Abstracts: 2018 February 9
Meeting Location: Pasadena, California, USA

Topics:

There will be 130 meetings covering the fields of the COSPAR Scientific 
Commissions (SC) and Panels:

- SC A:  The Earth's Surface, Meteorology and Climate
- SC B:  The Earth-Moon System, Planets, and Small Bodies of the Solar System
- SC C:  The Upper Atmospheres of the Earth and Planets Including Reference Atmospheres
- SC D:  Space Plasmas in the Solar System, Including Planetary Magnetospheres
- SC E:  Research in Astrophysics from Space, including:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-  Dark Energy at 20
-  Structure, Evolution and Dynamics of Neutron Stars
-  Activity of the Super-massive Black Hole and Other Energetic Processes at the Galactic Center
-  AGN X-ray Surveys: Soft to Hard and Deep to Wide
-  The Extreme Physics of Eddington and Super Eddington Accretion onto Compact 
   Objects: Simulations Meet Observations
-  Cherenkov Telescope Array: The Ground-based Eyes to Observe the Gamma Ray Universe
-  The Gravitational Wave Universe
-  Large Space-based Optical and Infrared Surveys
-  X- and Gamma-ray Counterparts of the New Transients in the Multi-messenger Exploration Era
-  Knocking on Heaven's Door: CMB in Pursuit of the Footprint of Inflation
-  Millisecond Pulsars
-  Black Hole Astrophysics: Observational Evidence of Theoretical Models
-  Origin of Cosmic Rays
-  Spectral Meets Timing: A Global Approach to Accretion onto Compact Objects
-  Nova Eruptions, Cataclysmic Variables and Related Systems: Observational 
   vs. Theoretical Challenges in the 2020 Era
-  The Multi-wavelength View at the Universe as Triggered by the RadioAstron Mission
-  Ultraviolet Astronomy and the Quest for the Origin of Life
-  Solar and Stellar Flares: Multi-wavelength Observations and Simulations
-  Formation, Destabilization, and Ejection of Magnetic Structures in Solar and Stellar Coronae
-  Solar Magnetism: Data-Driven Modeling and Requirements for Future Instrumentation
-  Current and Future Projects for Exoplanets Detections and Characterization
-  Planet Formation at High Resolution
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

- SC F:  Life Sciences as Related to Space
- SC G:  Materials Sciences in Space
- SC H:  Fundamental Physics in Space
- Panel on Satellite Dynamics (PSD)
- Panel on Scientific Ballooning (PSB)
- Panel on Potentially Environmentally Detrimental Activities in Space (PEDAS)
- Panel on Radiation Belt Environment Modeling (PRBEM)
- Panel on Space Weather (PSW)
- Panel on Planetary Protection (PPP)
- Panel on Capacity Building (PCB)
- Panel on Education (PE)
- Panel on Exploration (PEX)
- Panel on Interstellar Research (PIR)                 
- Special events:  interdisciplinary lectures, round table, etc.

Selected papers published in Advances in Space Research and Life Sciences in 
Space Research, fully refereed journals with no deadlines open to all 
submissions in relevant fields.

Scientific Program Chair: Prof. Thomas Prince, California Institute of Technology

Contact:       
COSPAR Secretariat, 2 place Maurice Quentin, 75039 Paris Cedex 01, France
Tel: +33 1 44 76 75 10
Fax: +33 1 44 76 74 37
cospar@cosparhq.cnes.fr

Are AGN Special? The Environmental Dependence and Global Impact of AGN Activity

Meeting Dates: 2018 July 30 - August 3
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2018 March 31

Powered by mass accretion onto super-massive black holes, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are undoubtedly exotic phenomena. According to most theoretical models of galaxy formation, AGN have also had a profound impact on the way the Universe looks today. However, AGN activity is, in another sense, a common phenomenon: the finding that essentially all massive galaxies host a central supermassive black hole clearly indicates that these galaxies have all hosted AGN activity at some point during their lives. Are these AGN phases a special period in the lifetime of the galaxy that require specific environmental conditions, or are they simply a random event that can occur at any time in any galaxy?

The objective of this international workshop is to bring together observers and theorists to explore the environmental dependence and global impact of AGN activity. During the five days of the workshop we will investigate:

  • What host-galaxy properties facilitate AGN activity?
  • What larger-scale environments facilitate AGN activity?
  • Is the high-redshift Universe a special environment for AGN activity?
  • How do AGN shape the way the Universe looks?

Contact: special.agn18 "at" durham.ac.uk

X-Ray Skies with High-Res Eyes: Imaging the Cosmos with AXIS

Workshop Dates: 2018 August 6 - 7
Deadlines for Abstract Submission and Registration: TBD
Workshop Location, Washington, DC, USA

The "X-Ray Skies with High-Res Eyes" workshop will be held at the Carnegie Institution for Science's main building in downtown Washington, DC (1530 P Street NW). The purpose of this meeting is to explore the cutting edge astrophysics enabled by a high angular resolution X-ray observatory in the next decade, present the AXIS (Advanced X-ray Imaging Satellite) science case to the community, and solicit feedback. AXIS is a probe concept under study for submission to the 2020 Decadal survey.

There will also be speakers from the AXIS team. The organizers are soliciting a limited number of contributed talks on topics related to high spatial resolution X-ray imaging and its connection with the broader astrophysical community. Organizational details and registration information will be forthcoming shortly.

Chandra Science Workshop on Accretion in Stellar Systems

Workshop Dates: 2018 August 8 - 10
Workshop Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

The workshop aims to bring together people working on accretion, outflows and related processes in diverse astrophysical objects, from protostars to cataclysmic variables to super-Eddington accretion in stellar mass black hole and neutron star binaries. The focus will be to understand how accretion and ejection work, how they affect stellar evolution, what important issues remain unanswered, and what are likely to be the most promising future research directions. The workshop will cover theory, simulations and observations, spanning the time domain, the entire electromagnetic spectrum, gravitational waves and energetic particles. A special session dedicated to the late Jeff McClintock's legacy to the field will also be held.

For more information, please visit the workshop website or contact: accr2018 "at" cfa.harvard.edu.

Very High Energy Phenomena in the Universe 2018 (VHEPU-2018, Rencontres du Vietnam)

Meeting Dates: 2018 August 12 - 18
Deadline for Early Bird Registration: 2018 June 12
Deadline for Abstract Submissions: 2017 July 12
Deadline for Regular Registration: 2018 July 22
Meeting Location: Quy Nhon, Vietnam

This summer, the "Rencontres du Vietnam" conference, entitled "Very High Energy Phenomena in the Universe 2018" (VHEPU-2018), will be devoted to high-energy astroparticle physics.

The main topics will cover:

  • Gamma-ray astronomy
  • Cosmic rays
  • Neutrino astronomy
  • Gravitational waves
  • Transient phenomena (gamma-ray bursts and multi-messenger astronomy)
  • Dark matter

Radionuclide Astronomy in the 2020's and Beyond (RA2020)

Workshop Dates: 2018 August 20 - 22
Workshop Location: Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

The purpose of the RA2020 workshop is focused on determining the potential science goals in radionuclide astronomy for next-generation X-ray and gamma-ray missions. This will include identifying and prioritizing open astrophysical questions on astrophysical sources of radionuclides that can be addressed by next-generation missions. We will identify the astrophysical modeling and nuclear data needs to maximize the science from these missions. The workshop will also provide a forum within which the community can present and review the current state of knowledge in hard x-rays and gamma-rays from radioactive nuclei produced in astrophysical transients and identify challenges and opportunities for the field in the near future. RA2020 is sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics - Center for the Evolution of the Elements.

The target audience includes astronomers and astrophysicists (observers, experimentalists, theorists), space mission scientists, nuclear and particle physicists (theorists and experimentalists in nuclear reactions, gamma production, and neutrino interactions), instrument developers, and other interested researchers including graduate students and recent PhD recipients.

Specific Goals of RA2020 include:

  1. Determine the constraints that next-generation telescopes can place on astrophysical sources of radionuclides;
  2. Identify the open problems that can be solved by these constraints;
  3. Identify the astrophysical modeling needs to take full advantage of the data from these next generation telescopes;
  4. Prioritize the modeling needs based on the demand to maximize mission scientific return;
  5. Identify the critical nuclear astrophysics data needs of NASA's current and near-term planned astrophysics missions;
  6. Prioritize those data needs based on the demand to maximize mission scientific return;
  7. Identify either the ideal properties of next-generation telescopes to maximize radionuclide astronomy science (based on the list of open problems) or determine the path needed to identify these properties.
  8. Develop strategies for community input to the Astro2020 Decadal Survey;
  9. Formulate a summary of prioritized needs to guide future NASA funding of the field.

The most important and valuable deliverable from RA2020 will be the Report summarizing the recommendations from the workshop. The Report will provide detailed findings on the critical astrophysical modeling and nuclear astrophysics data that are required to maximize the scientific return on NASA's current and near-term planned astrophysics missions and proposed priorities. The Report will be based on community input gathered at the workshop, discussions during workshop breakout sessions, and other solicited input deemed appropriate by the Scientific Organizing Committee (SOC). The Report will be prepared by the SOC and may also outline specific opportunities for high energy NASA missions, and articulate concrete actions by which the Agency can capitalize on the opportunities and mitigate challenges.

IAU Focus Meeting on "Radio Galaxies: Resolving the AGN Phenomenon" at the IAU General Assembly 2018

Meeting Dates: 2018 August 22 - 23
Early-bird Registration Deadline: 2018 January 31
Deadline for Regular Abstract Submission for Oral and Poster Contributions: 2018 February 28
Deadline for IAU Grant Submission: 2018 February 28
Deadline for Poster-only Submissions: 2018 May 31
Deadline for Regular Registration: 2018 June 30

Radio galaxies provide excellent laboratories to probe physical aspects, unification, and the cosmic evolution of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Thanks to recent multi-wavelength observations we are now able to separate many different physical components of radio galaxies through imaging and spectroscopy. Observations from the radio to the X-ray range can probe the ejection of matter into the jet and monitor decades of jet evolution. Gamma-ray observations have shown that radio galaxies are detectable up to the VHE range, despite unfavorable jet alignment. We observe radio galaxies out to redshifts larger than z=5, which makes them important cosmological probes. Planck maps have provided us with new insights into the populations of radio galaxies and their distributions in space in the 30-900 GHz range, NuSTAR provides high-quality spectra in the hard X-ray range, the EHT has begun mapping to the event horizon of the central black hole, and the SKA, E-ELT and other future telescopes will open up a new and vast discovery space. This meeting will bring together multiwavelength observers and theorists to synthesize progress made over the last three years and define future directions.

Topics:

  • Triggers of highly relativistic jets
  • Jet collimation
  • Radio galaxies as VHE photon emitters
  • Knots, hotspots and other structural features
  • The central engine
  • Radiative versus jet mode
  • Radio galaxy populations and statistics
  • Origin and evolution of radio galaxies
  • Interaction with the environment
  • Future telescopes' view on radio galaxies

For conference inquiries please email: cricci "at" astro.puc.cl

2018 TeV Particle Astrophysics (TeVPA)

Meeting Dates: 2018 August 27 - 31
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2018 June 1
Deadline for Early Bird Registration: 2018 July 7
Deadline for Regular Registration: 2018 August 17
Meeting Location: Berlin, Germany

The organizers are pleased to announce that the 2018 TeV Particle Astrophysics conference (TeVPA 2018) will take place in Berlin, Germany. TeVPA is a five day conference which aims to bring together leading scientists in the field to discuss recent advances in Astroparticle Physics. There will be parellel sessions in: Cosmic Rays, Cosmology, Dark Matter, Extragalactic, Galactic, Gamma-rays, GW and followup, Neutrinos, and Particle Physics.

For further information, contact tevpa2018 "at" desy.de.

IAU Symposium 346: High-Mass X-ray Binaries: Illuminating the Passage from Massive Binaries to Merging Compact Objects

Meeting Dates: 2018 August 27 - 31
Registration to the IAU XXX General Assembly 2018 and the corresponding fees will be handled by the IAU General Assembly organizers and are MANDATORY to participate in this event.
Registration: Now open
Deadline for Early-Bird Registration: 2018 Jaunary 31
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2018 February 28
Deadline for Rgeular Registration: 2018 June 30
Late/Onsite Registration: from 2018 July 31
Meeting Location: Vienna, Austria

The IAU Symposium 346 will be the first IAU symposium devoted to high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). The time has come to synthesize new knowledge from the incredibly rich trove of data, models, and theories on HMXBs accumulated over the last 50 years. The Symposium will bring together a broad range of scientists with the aim to share their insights and further advance our understanding of HMXBs. New powerful synergetic approaches will be developed and put in a broad astrophysical context during the XXX IAU General Assembly. The Symposium will build a bridge between mature field of massive binary astrophysics and nascent field of gravitational wave astronomy. This large international meeting will consolidate our knowledge on massive stars, binary evolution, accretion physics, compact objects and gravitational wave sources to give us a new perspective on the cosmos illuminated by HMXBs.

Contact e-mail: iaus346@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de

Register here to the MAILING LIST ONLY to receive news concerning the organization of the IAUS 346.

The Gamma Cas Phenomenon in Be Stars

Meeting Dates: 2018 September 3 - 5
Deadline for Registration: 2018 June 15
Meeting Capacity: 50 persons
Meeting Location: Strasbourg, France

Gamma-Cas is the first identified Be star and one of the first extra-solar X-ray sources discovered. However, it soon became clear that its very hard and luminous X-ray emission was at strong variance with that observed from the bulk of Be stars. Galactic X-ray surveys, mainly those carried out by XMM-Newton, led to the discovery of a handful of Be stars with similar X-ray properties and sharing a narrow range of characteristics.

The origin of the outstanding X-ray emission of Gamma-Cas and its analogs is one of the most vexing issue in X-ray stellar astrophysics. Magnetic interaction between the early type star and the decretion disc compete with accretion scenarios to explain these outstanding features. Both explanations have deep astrophysical implications on massive star evolution.

The goal of the meeting is to inform the stellar community of the "Gamma-Cas" phenomenon and confront the different views put forward to explain this salient behaviour.

8th International Workshop on Astronomy and Relativistic Astrophysics - IWARA 2018

Meeting Dates: 2018 September 9 - 15
Deadline for Registration and Abstract Submission: 2018 June 30
Meeting Location: Ollantaytambo, Peru

Our understanding of the origin of the Universe, of its evolution and the physical laws that govern its behavior, as well as on the different states of matter that makes up its evolutionary stage, reached in recent years levels never before imagined. This is due mainly to the new and recent discoveries in astronomy and relativistic astrophysics as well as to experiments on particle and nuclear physics that made the traditional boundaries of knowledge on physics to be overcome. As a result we have presently a new understanding about the Universe in its two extreme domains, the very large and the very small: the recognition of the deep connections that exist between quarks and the cosmos.

The intimate relationship between quarks and the cosmos has motivated the organization of the series of international events known by the acronym IWARA. The event is the eighth in a series of meetings gathering scientists working on astroparticle physics, cosmology, gravitation, nuclear physics, and related fields.

Contact iwara2018@gmail,com for more information or see the website listed above.

International Conference on Black Holes as Cosmic Batteries: UHECRs and Multimessenger Astronomy

Conference Dates: 2018 September 12 - 15
Deadline for Submission of Abstracts for Contributed Talks and Registration: 2018 July 15
Conference Location: Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil

Black Holes Cosmic Batteries (BHCB) 2018 will be dedicated to the presentation and discussion of recent observational, phenomenological, and theoretical developments in the field of high-energy phenomena associated with the dynamics of ultra-high energy cosmic rays and black holes. Some specific subjects are UHECRs luminosity production in relativistic outflows, multi-messengers astronomy and informations from cosmic rays, cosmic rays from gravitational waves, formation and propagation of relativistic jets and particle acceleration .

Scientific topics:

  • Ultra-high energy cosmic rays
  • UHECRs luminosity production
  • Gamma-rays
  • Neutrinos
  • Gravitational waves
  • Particle acceleration
  • Formation and propagation of relativistic jets
  • Accretion mechanisms and Jets
  • AGNs and Reconnection

Exploring the Hot and Energetic Universe: The Second Scientific Conference Dedicated to the Athena X-ray Observatory

Conference Dates: 2018 September 24 - 27
Deadline for Submission of Abstracts for Contributed Talks and Posters: 2018 February 23
Conference Location: Palermo, Sicily, Italy

Athena (the Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics) will continue the series of large X-ray observatories inaugurated by Chandra and XMM-Newton, offering transformational capabilities in several key areas. It is the second large-class ESA mission (L2), and it is planned for a launch towards the end of the next decade, around 2029.

The Phase A is progressing at full speed, with intense work in the ESA Study Team, the Instrument Teams and industry with the definition of a mission design baseline over the next 12-18 months. The organization of the second conference on Athena will thus give the opportunity to discuss with the astrophysical community its prospective scientific impact, also in the light of possible future X-ray missions (eROSITA, XARM, Arcus, etc.), of synergies with multi-wavelength facilities that will be operational at the end of the next decade, and of the advent of multi-messenger astronomy.

Breaking the Limits 2018: Super-Eddington Accretion onto Compact Objects

Meeting Dates: 2018 October 1 - 5
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2018 May 31
Deadline for Early Bird Registration: 2018 July 31
Late Registration: from 2018 August 1 and onsite
Meeting Location: Castiadas, Italy

Recent years have seen an increasing interest of the astronomical community on the topic of super-Eddington accretion on compact objects, which can apply to a variety of systems, such as supermassive black holes, black hole binaries, ULXs, neutron stars. Moreover, the possibility that the Eddington limit may be violated can have important implications for the related topics of black hole growth, galaxy evolution and AGN feedback.

After two years from the first edition of Breaking the Limits, we reconvene to discuss the advances made in the last two years. This workshop will be an opportunity to compare recent observations with state-of-the-art theoretical modeling of super-Eddington flows, and to discuss the cosmological implications of this regime of accretion.

The Multi-Messenger Astronomy: Gamma-Ray Bursts, Search for Electromagnetic Counterparts to Neutrino Events and Gravitational Waves

Meeting Dates:2018 October 7 - 14
Pre-registration Opens: 2018 May 1
Registration and Abstract Submission Open: 2018 June 1
Registration and Abstract Submission Close: 2018 August 7
Meeting Location: Nizhnij Arkhyz and Terskol, Russia

The international conference on this urgent topic will be held in Russia for the third time. The success of the first workshop held in October 2015 and the second conference held in October 2017 persuaded the organizers that such meetings arranged in locations of unique Russian Observatories - Special Astrophysical Observatory of RAS (SAO RAS), Baksan Neutrino Observatory of Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS (BNO INR RAS) and the International Observatory Peak Terskol - are well needed.

The scientific program covers a wide range of problems of the modern astrophysics including that of existence of quantum-chromodynimic (QCD) phase transition and matter states at high temperatures and densities. Such conditions are likely to be achievable only in astrophysical objects - collapsars of stellar mass, the objects whose formation is related with collapse and explosion of hot and dense cores of massive stars observable as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. Solution of such problems demands development of methods combining optical astronomical observations and experiments with neutrino telescopes, cosmic-ray recording sets and detectors of gravitational waves.

The conference program will also include talks and discussion on the THESEUS (Transient High-Energy Sky and Early Universe Surveyor) mission concept, being developed by a large International collaboration involving also SAO and BNO. THESEUS aims at exploiting high-redshift gamma-ray bursts for getting unique clues to the Universe and, being an unprecedentedly powerful machine for the detection, accurate location and redshift determination of all types of gamma-ray bursts (long, short, high-z, under-luminous, ultra-long) and many other classes of transient sources and phenomena, at providing a substantial contribution to multi-messenger astrophysics and time-domain astronomy. Under these respects, THESEUS will show a beautiful synergy with the large observing facilities of the future, like E-ELT, TMT, SKA, CTA, ATHENA, in the electromagnetic domain, as well as with next-generation gravitational-waves (aLIGO/ aVirgo, KAGRA, ILIGO, Einstein Telescope, LISA) and neutrino detectors, thus enhancing importantly their scientific return. Moreover, it will also operate as a flexible IR and X-ray observatory, thus providing an even larger involvement of the scientific community.

Eighth International Fermi Symposium

Meeting Dates: 2018 October 14 - 19
Meeting Location: Baltimore, Maryland, USA

This symposium follows previous Fermi Symposia at Stanford, CA (February 2007), Washington, DC (November 2009), Rome, Italy (May 2011), Monterey, CA (November 2012), Nagoya, Japan (October 2014), Arlington, VA (November 2015), and Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (October 2017).

The two Fermi instruments have been surveying the high-energy sky since August 2008. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) has discovered more than a thousand new sources and many new source classes, bringing the importance of gamma-ray astrophysics to an ever-broadening community. The LAT catalog includes supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, pulsars, binary systems, novae, several classes of active galaxies, starburst galaxies, normal galaxies, and a large number of unidentified sources. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from a wide range of transients. Fermi LAT's study of diffuse gamma-ray emission in our galaxy revealed giant bubbles shining in gamma rays. The direct measurement of a harder-than-expected cosmic-ray electron spectrum may imply the presence of nearby cosmic-ray accelerators. LAT data have provided stringent constraints on new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations as well as tests of fundamental physics. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) continues to be a prolific detector of gamma-ray transients: magnetars, solar flares, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and gamma-ray bursts at keV to MeV energies, complementing the higher energy LAT observations of those sources in addition to providing valuable science return in their own right.

All gamma-ray data are made immediately available at the Fermi Science Support Center. These publicly available data and Fermi analysis tools have enabled a large number of important studies. We especially encourage guest investigators worldwide to participate in this symposium to share results and to learn about upcoming opportunities.

This meeting will focus on the new scientific investigations and results enabled by Fermi, the mission and instrument characteristics, future opportunities, and coordinated observations and analyses.


Other Selected Astronomy, Physics and Space Science meetings

American Astronomical Society Meeting 232

Meeting Dates: 2018 June 3 - 7
Meeting Location: Denver, Colorado, USA

Cool Stars 20: The Twentieth Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stars, Stellar Systems, and the Sun

Workshop Dates: 2018 July 29 - August 3
Workshop Location: Boston/Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

International Astronomical Union 30th General Assembly

Meeting Dates; 2018 August 20 - 31
Registration: Now Open
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2018 February 28
Meeting Location: Vienna, Austria

American Astronomical Society Meeting 233

Meeting Dates: 2019 January 6 - 10
Meeting Location: Seattle, Washington, USA

American Astronomical Society Meeting 234

Meeting Dates: 2019 June
Meeting Location: TBD, USA

American Astronomical Society Meeting 235

Meeting Dates: 2018 January 5 - 9
Meeting Location: Honolulu, Hawaii, USA


Selected Astronomy-related Technology (e.g., Instrumentation) Meetings

None


Selected Astronomy-related Physics, Computational, Data Analysis, Software or Statistics Meetings

Summer School in Statistics for Astronomers XIV

Workshop Dates: 2018 May 29-June 2
Registration deadline: 2018 May 4 or when the classes are full
Workshop Location: State College, Pennsylvania, USA

Summer School in Astroinformatics

Workshop Dates: 2018 June 4 - 8
Registration deadline: 2018 May 4 or when the classes are full
Workshop Location: State College, Pennsylvania, USA

Penn State's Center for Astrostatistics is supplementing its long-standing week-long Summer School in statistical methodology with a new Summer School in Astroinformatics. Registration is now open; participants can attend one or both of the programs. Lectures and tutorials are presented by professors in statistics, computer science, astrostatistics and astroinformatics. Tutorials exercise methods with realistic contemporary astronomical dataset. Open-source software and lecture notes are provided. Participants should bring a laptop computer.

Summer School in Statistics for Astronomers: This week provides an intensive program in statistical inference and methods for observational astronomy. Topics include: principles of probability and inference; nonparametrics; regression and model selection; bootstrap resampling; maximum likelihood; Bayesian inference; multivariate clustering and classification; spatial statistics; and time series analysis. Hands-on training uses the R statistical software environment.

Summer School in Astroinformatics: This week gives a strong background in statistical and computational methodology for large astronomical datasets. Topics include: fundamentals of scientific computing and high-performance computing; Bayesian computation; machine learning algorithms; multivariate dimension reduction; clustering and classification; optimization; Gaussian Processes regression; neural networks and Deep Learning.


Selected Space Science-related Education and Public Outreach Meetings

None



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Last modified: Wednesday, 23-May-2018 07:57:17 EDT
Page Author: Stephen A. Drake (e-mail: Stephen.A.Drake 'at' nasa.gov)